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Bajpai, Ravi Dutt. Civilizational Perspectives in International Relations and Contemporary China-India Relations
2018, Civilizational Perspectives in International Relations and Contemporary China-India Relations. in "The ‘Clash of Civilizations’ 25 Years On: A Multidisciplinary Appraisal" eds Orsi, D. E-International Relations Publishing
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, Contributed by: Alex Lopez Postma
Abstract: This paper explores the assumptions of civilizational identities purely based on cultural, religious or geographical distinctions and their limitations. It reviews the ‘civilizations’ discourse in IR and discusses the concept of ‘civilization states’ in the context of China and India. It analyzes the key components of civilizational overlaps and exchanges between these two countries and the invocation of their ‘civilization-state’ identity in their contemporary bilateral relations. Rejecting Huntington’s ‘clash of civilizations’ hypothesis in understanding ‘civilization-states’ like China and India, I conclude that it is critical to understand how states perceive their civilizational heritage, which both facilitates and impedes bilateral exchanges and the conduct of international relations.

Comment: Offers a critique of the basic assumptions in IR. Argues that any purposeful analysis of the China-India bilateral relationship and their worldviews is not possible without studying their inter-civilizational links. This text could be used to discuss cultural generalizations and cross cultural links. Suitable for a course on postcolonial IR.

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Mohan, C. Raja. ‘India and the Balance of Power’
2006, Foreign Affairs, 85(4), pp. 17–32.
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, Contributed by: Koen te Wierike
Abstract: India is on the verge of becoming a great power and the swing state in the international system. As a large, multiethnic, economically powerful, non-Western democracy, it will play a key role in the great struggles of the coming years. Washington has recognized the potential of a U.S.-Indian alliance, but translating that potential into reality will require engaging India on its own terms.

Comment: This article discusses the transformative role of India in the global stage. The author describes that the Western powers still treat India like the weaker nation it was 50 years ago. Mohan argues that that India has earned a spot on among the global powers and the Western powers should change their political/ foreign policy regarding India if they want to engage with them.

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Rajni Kothari. POLITICS IN INDIA
1972, Kothari, R. (1972) Politics in india. Repr edn. New Delhi: Orient Blackswan.
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, Contributed by: Dina K
Publisher’s Note:

Acclaimed to be by far the most sophisticated general study on Indian politics. Politics in India unfolds, here with insight and acumen and the vastness and confusion of the Indian political scene is elaborately discussed. This book is the first comprehensive treatment of the Indian political system examined from different vantage points and drawing together the contribution of various disciplines into a common framework.

Comment: This renowned book is an important one for any scholar of history of politics, society and IR in India, having set the foundations for Indian academic perspectives on the Indian national systems of government. The ground-breaking analysis was the first to assess post-colonial Indian politics, culture and societal norms, as well as democracy from a broader perspective, distinct from the previously uncontested Western hegemony within social sciences. The book theorises on the concepts of power and modernisation, and challenges the academic hegemony of the 1970s. The redefinition of such concepts from an Indian perspective had important effects on West-centric disciplines, especially in light of India’s colonial history.

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