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Araújo, Marta, Maeso, Silvia. Eurocentrism, Racism and Knowledge: Debates on History and Power in Europe and the Americas
2014, Eurocentrism, racism and knowledge : debates on history and power in europe and the americas and the americas. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
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Publisher’s Note:

This collection is an interdisciplinary effort drawing on the work of international scholars and political activists. It addresses key questions in the critique of Eurocentrism and racism regarding debates on the production and sedimentation of knowledge, historical narratives and memories in Europe and the Americas. By conceiving Eurocentrism as a paradigm of interpretation, and race as the key principle of the modern order, the authors bring the relation between knowledge and power to the centre of debate. The book invites to consider institutionalized violence as pervading the regulation of the heterogeneity of (post-)colonial territories and peoples, and to see the politics of knowledge production as a struggle for power seeking profound change. At the heart of this collective endeavour is the long history of international and domestic liberation politics and thought, as well as academic and political reaction through formulas of accommodation that re-centre the West.

Comment: This edited volume is useful for providing an overview of the debates surrounding eurocentrism and the consequent systems of knowledge that have been produced as a result. As such, the book demonstrates the persistent coloniality within academia. It is also useful for its interdisciplinary approach. Moreover, in engaging specifically with the concept of eurocentrism, this book provides the means through which to remember the historical role played by the West and specifically Europe, while also allowing the reader to be critical of new forms of imperialism and domination, such as neocolonialism and neo-developmentalism, in Africa, Asia and the Americas, which are driven by the same Eurocentric approach. As such, it is useful for a course on political history, history of the Americas and modern day global relations.

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Gülşah Çapa, Zeynep. Decolonising International Relations?
2017, Third World Quarterly, 38(1), pp. 1–15. doi: 10.1080/01436597.2016.1245100.
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Abstract:

How do we ‘decolonise’ the field of International Relations? The aim to decolonise has become a widely discussed and mentioned subject across the social sciences and humanities. The article aims to discuss what 'decolonisation' might mean in the context of the field of International Relations.

Comment: This is a good introductory article for a course on the history of international relations and decolonising international relations history. It provides a good starting point for the debate on decolonising IR and knowledge production in the field of IR. Rather than a "roadmap" on how to go about decolonising the field, the article includes an exploration into the possibilities and potentialities of decolonising, thus it opens up the field to less conventional means of thinking and producing knowledge.

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Ndlovu-Gatsheni, Sabelo J. The Entrapment of Africa within the Global Colonial Matrices of Power
2013, Journal of Developing Societies, 29(4), pp. 331–353.
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, Contributed by: Rens Collet
Abstract: This article deploys world-systems analysis and the concept of coloniality to examine the experience of the African people within the modern world-system since 1492, a date that figuratively marks the birth of the modern world-system and its shifting international orders. Africa’s experience is contextualized within six international orders: the post-1492 order, the Westphalian order that emerged in 1648, the post-1884–1885 Berlin consensus, the post-1945 United Nations normative order, the Cold War epoch that ended in 1989, the current neoliberal dispensation as well as the post 9/11 anti-terrorism and securitization. While Africans have actively contested Euro–North American hegemony throughout these periods, they have not yet succeeded in breaking the strong global technologies of coloniality that continue to prevent the possibilities of African agency. This is why this article ends with a call for deepening the decolonization and deimperialization of the international order in the twenty-first century.

Comment: Useful for offering alternate perspective to Wallerstein's world system theory. Theorizes not about the detrimental effects of colonialism, put also offers a more constructivist approach to analyzing Africa's current position in the world system.

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Zondi, Siphamandla. Decolonising International Relations and Its Theory: A Critical Conceptual Meditation
2018, Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies, 45(1), pp. 16–31.
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Abstract: One of the main implications of the push for transition from the monoculture of Eurocentric scientific knowledge towards the ecology of knowledge is to force us to pose the question: what does a decolonial turn in International Relations (IR) entail? This article grapples with this question in light of growing demands for a decolonial turn in knowledge and power. The aim is to meditate on this question with a view to open up new avenues for a structured conversation on decolonising IR and its theory. This imperative to decolonise is linked to the question of epistemic justice with implications for the epistemological structure underpinning IR, methodological frameworks for the study of IR, theoretical outlines and the teaching of the discipline. Epistemic justice is a necessity alongside historical justice for those on the margins of a world system constructed with the help of imperialism, systematic enslavement and colonialism. This article discusses the question of the decolonial turn in IR in the hope of stimulating debates on the views of the margins regarding the present state and the future of this area of knowledge, and thus move us closer to an ecology of knowledge and power.

Comment: This text can be used as an introduction to decolonization in IR to show opposed views to the mainly Eurocentric research. It is not very specific in its elaboration but underlines the need for a revision of the field of IR and its concepts. Rather, the article suggest a broad frame of the debate as a starting point to discussions about how we might go about shifting the geography of reason within International Relations from a Eurocentric one towards a "pluriversal multilogue of epistemologies".

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